D’Sean Perry’s Death At UVA Shooting Could Have Been Prevented, Parents Say!

D’Sean Perry’s Death At UVA Shooting Could Have Been Prevented, Parents Say!

Every day at 10 a.m. and 10 p.m., D’Sean Perry called his mother to ensure she arrived home from work without incident. After a class excursion to attend a play in Washington on November 13, at 10:06 p.m., he informed her that he was almost back at the University of Virginia, that his phone was acting up, and that he would contact her when he got off the bus and into his car. But I never received the call, claiming Happy Perry.

A few minutes later, her husband, Sean Perry, questioned her about speaking with their kid after seeing a post on social media about an active shooter at the University of Virginia.

There was no response when she tried to phone D’Sean once more. She dialed the campus police, the school, and his football coaches. A clinic and a helpline. Friends of D’Sean. She made travel arrangements from Miami to Virginia. She whispered, “I was waiting for him to phone me and let me know he’s safe.

D’Sean Perry’s parents have expressed concerns about why the violence was not stopped, including by the university their son loved, a month after he and two of his football teammates were shot to death as they returned from a field trip. They stated they would support initiatives to raise mental health awareness and reform gun restrictions. They also urged college players to spread the word about these issues on their increasingly influential social media platforms.

Happy Perry reportedly remarked, “I just don’t want any mother, father, family, sister, brother, aunt, or uncle to have to go through what we’re going through right now.” “That’s a start if my voice may be of any assistance.”

Perry, a student-athlete renowned for his strict academic and athletic discipline as well as his joyful fun, was assassinated along with classmates Lavel Davis Jr. and Devin Chandler only months before he was set to graduate. In the incident, two additional classmates sustained injuries. The following day, Christopher Darnell Jones Jr., a different kid on the bus, was taken into custody.

Sean and Happy Perry said that, like the relatives of other victims, they had never heard of Jones from their son. They were aware of no tension or strife.

However, Jones was previously known to the institution. After the incident, school officials stated Jones’ claim that he possessed a gun attracted the attention of the university’s threat assessment team in mid-September. Jones had not been known to threaten anybody, nor had his roommate seen him with a pistol. The school claimed he refused to comply when questioned, and officials later discovered he had been found guilty of a minor concealed-weapons offense the previous year but had neglected to disclose it.

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Happy Perry stated, “I want the world to know that D’Sean was a loving, kind, and decent son. He has strong family values. His faith was important to him. And he was interested in football. And he carried out every task correctly and according to plan. And it’s such a tragedy that it happens six months before he’s supposed to graduate from college. It’s just absurd, you know. And unbelievable.

D’Sean Perry’s son played football with Michael Haggard’s son at Gulliver Preparatory School in Miami. Michael Haggard said the family is awaiting the investigation findings into the incident. However, they know that “that combination is repeatedly lethal” when people have easy access to firearms and mental health problems.

Haggard asserted that the university should have severely enforced the law prohibiting guns on campus as soon as it became aware of worries about a potential weapon and other difficulties.

Happy Perry stated that while the threat assessment procedure was ongoing, “Once they found out all that stuff, he should have been punished or put off campus.” “I believe that this could have been avoided,” you say.

An independent inquiry into the shooting and the circumstances leading up to it has been sought by U-Va officials, and Virginia’s attorney general said last week that a former U.S. attorney and two other attorneys had been selected to conduct the investigation.

The university had requested an external review. We continue to mourn the passing of Devin Chandler, Lavel Davis Jr., and D’Sean Perry, U-Va. President Jim Ryan said in a statement following the announcement of the special counsel team, “We are committed to working with the special counsel team to learn as much as we can about this event and the circumstances that led to it and to apply those lessons to keep our community safe.” Jones’s legal counsel did not immediately answer an inquiry for comment.

According to the Perrys, they want to convey a message transcending U-Va. Happy Perry said, “We just want to raise awareness of mental health, and we want to open up the college football world’s eyes, hearts, and brains and ask that they join us in this fight for gun reform.”

Sean Perry stated that since it’s not only his family, “We’re looking for other students, college athletes, to spread the message.” We must support one another at this time. Right now, we require that.

In their phone conversation, Haggard mentioned that Sean Perry was sporting a UVA tie, and his wife was sporting a UVA boutonniere. “They adore the school; D’Sean loved the school, and the school offered him a terrific opportunity.” But the school failed, he added. It’s pretty straightforward.

He asserted that U. Virginia could contribute to the answer and set an example for other colleges when it comes to managing students who have guns. He added that the Perrys are hopeful that U-Va. Will support them “not only in the grief process, flying teams to funerals — which is a wonderful gift — but about stopping this in the future.”

The massacre rocked the college, and students came together to remember Davis, Chandler, and Perry for a moving memorial service. And the effects extended well beyond Virginia. College football teams and supporters from all across the nation paid respect to U-Va at their upcoming games by donning the school’s blue and orange, placing stickers on their helmets, or raising signs in the school’s support.

Perry’s football teammates at Gulliver in Miami and the University of Virginia talked about how much they admired him for his faith, self-discipline on and off the field, strength, and generosity.

Perry frequently wrote about his objectives and drove to make his parents and city proud. His mother works for the postal service, and his father is a correctional officer. After graduation, he intended to play in the NFL and continue his art studies.

On the football field, the young man was all business. Still, at home, he was lighthearted, making his family grin and surprise them with practical jokes, such as appearing in a Halloween mask or making his mother laugh by coaxing lizards onto a leaf. “However, he always said, ‘I love you, Mom, you don’t have to worry,’ throughout our conversations. “I’ll be home,” and

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